Stratocaster Grounding - Just a Curiosity

Started by pasha811, January 15, 2024, 12:39:10 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

pasha811

Lately I came across a youtube video (that I cannot find) and and article that suggests a 'clean' grounding for a Stratocaster type of Guitar.
Because it deviates from the 'norm' I'd like to have your word on that.
As you know the Stratocaster wiring schema implements both an aluminum foil behind the pickguard and a ground wire that interconnects all tones and volume (including grounding the Volume lug to the case) as shown here : Stratocaster Player Wiring

In that article it was suggested to use the G string to connect Tones, Volume, passing through the Volume Pot lug and soldered to the Volume Pot case and the pot lug. Moreover it was suggested to hook and solder the pickups ground wires to the G string to avoid soldering so many wires on the Volume Pot case as it makes for easier changes along the road.  Sure that is 'Cleaner' but... a grounding wire with no insulation?
What do you think?

 
Listen to my music at :  http://alonetone.com/pasha/

IMH1234

Quote from: pasha811 on January 15, 2024, 12:39:10 AMLately I came across a youtube video (that I cannot find) and and article that suggests a 'clean' grounding for a Stratocaster type of Guitar.
Because it deviates from the 'norm' I'd like to have your word on that.
As you know the Stratocaster wiring schema implements both an aluminum foil behind the pickguard and a ground wire that interconnects all tones and volume (including grounding the Volume lug to the case) as shown here : Stratocaster Player Wiring

In that article it was suggested to use the G string to connect Tones, Volume, passing through the Volume Pot lug and soldered to the Volume Pot case and the pot lug. Moreover it was suggested to hook and solder the pickups ground wires to the G string to avoid soldering so many wires on the Volume Pot case as it makes for easier changes along the road.  Sure that is 'Cleaner' but... a grounding wire with no insulation?
What do you think?

 

Not sure I understand what they are proposing - I can't see any rational case for soldering anything onto a guitar string - even if there was a technical benefit to doing so- changing strings is enough of a chore without needing to break out the soldering iron - imagine having to do that mid song  :o

Uninsulated grounding wires are only an issue if they might touch another part of the circuit - I use them regularly on arch top builds to connect to the tailpiece through the body - which BTW does involve a direct ground connection to the strings via a conductive material in contact with the ball ends.

IMH1234

Thinking about this a bit more - are they suggesting using a g-string in place of grounding wire? Not sure why anyone would not just use proper electrical wire - it sounds like another case of a 'solution' looking for a non existent problem or am I missing something?

Elantric


gumbo

Ah...right...
...yeah, well.....  ???

Not quite sure what the actual 'advantage' is, but my mind does run to the question of the amount of heat applied to the back of the pots to melt the ginormous blobs of solder... but perhaps I'm over-thinking things as usual.   :-X
Read slower!!!   ....I'm typing as fast as I can...

IMH1234

Quote from: Elantric on January 15, 2024, 02:01:43 PMAka Bus Wire


To which by response is a clear: use a single core bus wire designed for purpose if you want to do this sort of thing not a guitar string - heavy gauge fuse wire works well, is cheap, readily available and what a professional would use

pasha811

#6
Thanks a lot all of you!
Sorry my English was not up to the task of making things clear... Hopefully Elantric found out the proper meaning! The picture posted is exactly what they suggested by using a G-String instead of a fuse wire.
Googling it reports :

It is a wire made out of a metal like tin or tin alloy having a very low melting point. When a high current flows through a circuit, the fuse wire gets heated or melts due to short-circuiting or overloading. Hence the circuit is broken and the current stops flowing. This saves all the appliances of the circuit


So... a naked wire.
Unlikely to melt during a performance unless you are on Speed Metal Show!  :o  8)
I can also use a Copper solid wire 22AWG stripped of plastic insulation if more appropriate than a G-String.. I got plenty of those!
Listen to my music at :  http://alonetone.com/pasha/

pasha811

Quote from: IMH1234 on January 15, 2024, 01:38:43 PMNot sure I understand what they are proposing - I can't see any rational case for soldering anything onto a guitar string - even if there was a technical benefit to doing so- changing strings is enough of a chore without needing to break out the soldering iron - imagine having to do that mid song  :o

Uninsulated grounding wires are only an issue if they might touch another part of the circuit - I use them regularly on arch top builds to connect to the tailpiece through the body - which BTW does involve a direct ground connection to the strings via a conductive material in contact with the ball ends.

I think the culprit was 'using the G String' instead of the more appropriate 'using a G String' in this case...  :P
What difference it makes 'The' vs 'A' :P
Listen to my music at :  http://alonetone.com/pasha/

gumbo

Quote from: pasha811 on January 16, 2024, 01:51:50 AMI think the culprit was 'using the G String' instead of the more appropriate 'using a G String' in this case...  :P
What difference it makes 'The' vs 'A' :P

As long as you are not wearing it when you solder it.... ;D
Read slower!!!   ....I'm typing as fast as I can...

IMH1234

Quote from: pasha811 on January 16, 2024, 01:46:27 AMSo... a naked wire.

Naked wires and g-strings - this thread is getting a bit racey!!!

As a summary, insulation isn't needed for grounding wires - just an appropriate conductive wire - Gibson typically used bare wire between pots on their vintage instruments and arguably, the braided sheath on their pickup hookup wire is basically the same thing. What is important is to ensure that there is a sensible path to earth for all the grounded components (avoiding multiple different paths/loops) and that no shorts are created by uninsulated grounds making contact with other parts of the circuit. If vintage accuracy isn't an issue it is usually as easy to use shielded hookup wire but even on vintage Gibsons wires likely to touch others were fed through tubing.

The advantage in using unshielded ground wires is if you need vintage accuracy, aesthetics and it is generally easier to feed through small holes to earth bridges and suchlike. If the cable is appropriately conductive it will work but that isn't an argument for using random stuff like guitar strings, strips of kitchen foil or copper pipe and such like when there is a proper solution available.

IMH1234

Quote from: pasha811 on January 16, 2024, 01:46:27 AMI can also use a Copper solid wire 22AWG stripped of plastic insulation if more appropriate than a G-String.. I got plenty of those!

Yes - that would be a good option

pasha811

Quote from: IMH1234 on January 16, 2024, 04:36:02 AMNaked wires and g-strings - this thread is getting a bit racey!!!


OPS... It was unintentional... sorry (It's the problem when you write/speak in a language that's not native for you)... in any case the same happens with non-Italians speaking Italian... :-)
Listen to my music at :  http://alonetone.com/pasha/

IMH1234

Quote from: pasha811 on January 16, 2024, 08:07:49 AMOPS... It was unintentional... sorry (It's the problem when you write/speak in a language that's not native for you)... in any case the same happens with non-Italians speaking Italian... :-)

No need to apologise - your non native English is probably as good or better than my native English (never mind my woeful attempts to communicate in Italian)!!!