SY-1000 Quarter Pounder

Started by Bill Ruppert, January 02, 2024, 06:10:53 PM

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Bill Ruppert

This is the SY-1000 using just the 1/4 input jack.

ktat


Kevin M

Quote from: Bill Ruppert on January 02, 2024, 06:10:53 PMThis is the SY-1000 using just the 1/4 input jack.


Sounds great. Do you tend to use this approach more than 13-pin on the SY1000?

aliensporebomb

Love the Holdsworthian legato style section - very melodic along side the polysynth chords.  Nice one!
My music projects online at http://www.aliensporebomb.com/

GK Devices:  Roland VG-99, Boss GP-10, Boss SY-1000.

Bill Ruppert

Thank you guys.

Kevin with the SY-1000 all I use is the 1/4 input.
For me, it just feels more organic and unique sound wise.
I suppose I feel more connected to the sound as well.
I love the sound of my magnetic humbuckers, and having the sound change in timber as well as feel when changing pickups is great.

As for the regular "guitar into amp sound" using the 1/4 in is the only way to go.
I never bonded with the modeling or buffered type guitar sounds using the 13 pin cable.
That is just my feelings.

aliensporebomb

My favorite SY-1000 distorted guitar sound is a Klon type overdrive into the quarter-inch in of the SY-1000 and a little compression (in the SY) followed by a bit of the X-OD overdrive which gives a blend of drive tones the Klon wouldn't give by itself nor would the X-OD either followed by the natural amp type (speaker type original) with a little delay and reverb.

I agree with your assessment regarding modeling or buffered type sounds via 13-pin. 
My music projects online at http://www.aliensporebomb.com/

GK Devices:  Roland VG-99, Boss GP-10, Boss SY-1000.

ktat

This thread turned out to be educational for me.  I've been using the VG99, GP10, and SY1000 pretty much exclusively since their releases and the entire time I've been running my normal pickups down the 13 pin cable.  For countless recordings and gigs.  I just started there and built my tones around the way that sounded...

Two days ago I started my normal practice session plugged into the SY 1/4 inch.  About 45 min in I went back to the 13 pin.  I didn't realize what it was doing to my tone!  Then last night I played my steady gig with the 1/4 inch guitar in.  I guess once you know, you're never going back!

As much as I hate using 2 cables, I guess this is how I move forward.  Is this what most of you do?

Brak(E)man

Quote from: ktat on January 06, 2024, 10:55:54 AMAs much as I hate using 2 cables, I guess this is how I move forward.  Is this what most of you do?

I'm only going through the GK cable , I'd never have the hassle with double cables from the guitar. I have no problem with the sound I'm getting from the normal PU that way (it's mojo imho) , but we all use the units differently and for different reasons.
Also mojo or psycho-acoustics are not to be disregarded or taken lightly.
As long as it works it works.
swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
- Lydia Lunch

IMH1234

Quote from: ktat on January 06, 2024, 10:55:54 AMAs much as I hate using 2 cables, I guess this is how I move forward.  Is this what most of you do?

100% use separate cables but am only using the Roland units for synth and synth modelling sounds in the studio. For traditional guitar tones I am fortunate to have access to many of the original instruments and amps that are being modelled so prefer to treat these as two separate signal paths. Also, I rarely play live and certainly don't move about much/at all so two cables is not the inconvenience others may find it.

kevorkian

Quote from: ktat on January 06, 2024, 10:55:54 AMThis thread turned out to be educational for me.  I've been using the VG99, GP10, and SY1000 pretty much exclusively since their releases and the entire time I've been running my normal pickups down the 13 pin cable.  For countless recordings and gigs.  I just started there and built my tones around the way that sounded...

Two days ago I started my normal practice session plugged into the SY 1/4 inch.  About 45 min in I went back to the 13 pin.  I didn't realize what it was doing to my tone!  Then last night I played my steady gig with the 1/4 inch guitar in.  I guess once you know, you're never going back!

As much as I hate using 2 cables, I guess this is how I move forward.  Is this what most of you do?

I've always used an additional 1/4" cable in addition to my 13 pin to preserve the tone from my standard pickups.

Bill Ruppert

It's more than mojo or psycho-acoustics. To my ears The buffer in the GK2 does not sound great with high impedance "passive" pickups.
A passive pickups signal is very fragile and easy to load down. I imagine that is one reason they put the "cable simulator" in the SY-1000's normal input circuit.
I just record, so it no big issue for me to plug straight in. (I also don't use the 13 pin much... if ever)
(I even like the sound when you plug into the 1/4 input using a high gain sound, you get that microphonic tube amp clink :-)


aliensporebomb

Bill: do you note any differences between high and low output pickups in such an application?  I've noticed something with some of my instruments lately and it appears low output passives produce the "nicest" tones.  Which seem to run counter to marketing over the years. 
My music projects online at http://www.aliensporebomb.com/

GK Devices:  Roland VG-99, Boss GP-10, Boss SY-1000.

Brak(E)man

Quote from: Bill Ruppert on January 07, 2024, 06:44:14 AMIt's more than mojo or psycho-acoustics. To my ears The buffer in the GK2 does not sound great with high impedance "passive" pickups.

What you are describing is exactly what I consider psycho-acoustic or mojo imho , not trying to argue here just saying how I see it.
(I'm not saying that the difference is not there and that it's not important to you.)

With the same guitar but different sounds I can play very differently.
Some sounds makes me able to play technically very fast , other make faster musical decisions. ( I'm not speaking about different attacks etc just tonal variations). It very obvious that psycho-acoustics are a big part of music.

The main thing is that we perceive things very different and we use it very different.
But as said whatever works works and it is eminent that it works for you.
swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
- Lydia Lunch

Bill Ruppert

Well, I am talking about something a little more concrete.
When the input impedance of a circuit is low and feed with a very high impedance signal, some of the upper frequency are shunted to ground or muted. It's a roll off and kills the transients up in that range.
It's real science.

The classic Big Muff pedal was called a "MUFF" as Mike Matthews thought it sounded muffled, and it does sound muffed as the input circuit is too low for a high impedance pickup.It's part of the "sound".
David Gilmour on the other hand has an active system in his guitar, which besides boosting the mids a little, feeds a Big Muff with a low impedance signal...and that is the "Floyd" sound with a Big Muff. Not Muffled at all.

It's all interesting stuff and a rabbit hole, so just get something that work for you and play music:-)

Bill Ruppert

Quote from: aliensporebomb on January 07, 2024, 06:56:47 AMBill: do you note any differences between high and low output pickups in such an application?  I've noticed something with some of my instruments lately and it appears low output passives produce the "nicest" tones.  Which seem to run counter to marketing over the years. 
There is an input level control on the Normal Input that I adjust per preset that helps match what I want to hear.
I often will lower my volume pot a little and that loads the pickup down a tiny bit tone wise to find the sweet spot I want in upper end.
Often the guitar manufactures throw a capacitor across the pot to prevent the loading when turning down a pot, but I take them out.

kevorkian

Quote from: Bill Ruppert on January 07, 2024, 08:36:17 AMOften the guitar manufactures throw a capacitor across the pot to prevent the loading when turning down a pot, but I take them out.

I remove the treble bypass capacitors from my guitars as well. The result they produce when rolling the volume down is somewhat akin to that of a poorly buffered passive pickup (to my ear).