Newbie question re: Godin Multiac MIDI output

Started by goffredo, December 07, 2023, 11:14:21 AM

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goffredo

Hello guys, first time post here.  I live in Switzerland and I fell in love with the nylon string Godin Multiac and Grand Concert at my local guitar store in Winterthur.  I've been reading a lot of information here but I must admit I'm a bit lost with the terminology and have never really worked with MIDI before.  I hope someone can gently help guide me.

I don't gig, I plan only to record and practice at home on a Mac (2023 Mac Mini M2 Pro). I am interested in using my guitar to simulate bass guitar, 12-string, piano / synth, and to record this into and arrange on my Mac.  I play on nylon strings and touch on classical, neoclassical thrash, flamenco style and gypsy.  Think Bach / Segovia, Yngwie, Jason Becker, Al DiMeola, Django Reinhardt.

I also don't have ANY gear right other than the Mac.  I'm starting fresh and need advice.

First is the guitar.  If I plan to do "midi stuff" as per above, when purchasing a Godin Multiac (or Grand Concert), is it advantageous for my plans to opt for a Godin Multiac that has the "SA" option -- that is, the 13-pin MIDI output that is integrated into the 6 independent 'hex' pickups on the guitar?  Or has MIDI technology advanced to the point where I can accomplish the same thing without needing the guitar itself to host the special MIDI pickups and output?

I ask because I must decide upon a Multiac with either the "SA" MIDI output option, --OR-- no MIDI output, but a fancy LR Baggs internal body pickup, which is great for percussive guitar work like string & body slaps, and which sounds really good when blended in with the string pickups using the guitar's built-in pickup blend slider.

Brent Flash


Brent Flash

#2
Quote from: goffredo on December 07, 2023, 11:14:21 AMFirst is the guitar.  If I plan to do "midi stuff" as per above, when purchasing a Godin Multiac (or Grand Concert), is it advantageous for my plans to opt for a Godin Multiac that has the "SA" option -- that is, the 13-pin MIDI output that is integrated into the 6 independent 'hex' pickups on the guitar?  Or has MIDI technology advanced to the point where I can accomplish the same thing without needing the guitar itself to host the special MIDI pickups and output?

I ask because I must decide upon a Multiac with either the "SA" MIDI output option, --OR-- no MIDI output, but a fancy LR Baggs internal body pickup, which is great for percussive guitar work like string & body slaps, and which sounds really good when blended in with the string pickups using the guitar's built-in pickup blend slider.

I really wish they (the powers that be that came up with 13 pin equipment) would never have used MIDI as a term associated with the divided pickup used today. The 13 pin output of divided pickups is not a Musical Instrument Digital Iinterface = MIDI. That being said the 13 pin equipment does open a vast range of things you can do with the right equipment once you plug it into them. I am sure more replies are coming to answer your specific questions.

Brak(E)man

#3
 I have a Multiac and my advice is to get the hex SA + try a GP-10 for both modeling instruments and as a guitar to midi converter for softsynths etc
( imho one of the better gtm ) via usb.
You can record ( or play live ) both Audio and Midi with the GP-10 simultaneously , GP-10 works as soundcard.
The Godins with RCM hex piezo works best imho.
swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
- Lydia Lunch

goffredo

Thanks for the input folks.

So in terms of the sound processing performed by a GP-10 pedal, how would a Godin Multiac with the "SA" option (built-in 13-pin output) compare to the exact same Godin guitar without the "SA" option (NO built-in 13-pin output) but, for example, with the aftermarket GP-3 pickup installed on it?

Or to put it more simply, is the 13-pin output from Godin's factory installed bridge pickups going to be much better than an aftermarket customer-installed GP-3 pickup, for sound processing through, for example, the GP-10?

My motivation in asking this is because I have to pick between the built-in 13-pin output ("SA" option) OR a nice Lyric body pickup ("Deluxe" option) but no built-in 13-pin output. 

Brak(E)man

#5
Quote from: goffredo on December 09, 2023, 02:53:31 AMThanks for the input folks.

So in terms of the sound processing performed by a GP-10 pedal, how would a Godin Multiac with the "SA" option (built-in 13-pin output) compare to the exact same Godin guitar without the "SA" option (NO built-in 13-pin output) but, for example, with the aftermarket GP-3 pickup installed on it?

Or to put it more simply, is the 13-pin output from Godin's factory installed bridge pickups going to be much better than an aftermarket customer-installed GP-3 pickup, for sound processing through, for example, the GP-10?

My motivation in asking this is because I have to pick between the built-in 13-pin output ("SA" option) OR a nice Lyric body pickup ("Deluxe" option) but no built-in 13-pin output. 

You said nylon strings in the thread start so I'm guessing that's the Q
A GK 3 PU is a magnetic PU so , not with regular nylon strings.
Nylon with steel core strings ( I believe these ones Thomastik KR 116 if my memory serves me right)
can however be an option but the sound of these strings are a bit different imho
So better try them first.
also the response from the PU can be uneven.
The Multiac with hex piezo works with regular nylon strings.

swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
- Lydia Lunch

goffredo

Aha.  Thank you for showing me the rather obvious, now that I think about it, advantage of using the built-in bridge hex piezos in the Godin "SA" package.  With the add-on GP-3 pickup I'd be limited to using special steel-core nylon strings.

I'll probably still get the pickup option with the GP-10, so I can put the pickup on a steel-string guitar in the future. 

I guess the next thing I need to figure out is what kind of software to get for my Mac to record and sequence.

Tosh

The Mac comes with Garage Band. It works very well, for a free application. Many Mac users are happy with Logic Pro X (myself included).

There is no limit to what you can acquire, but at what cost?

Nickertronix

This is pretty good studio software, and most importantly - free!

https://www.tracktion.com/products/waveform-free

Although GarageBand is a capable DAW, and you already have that in MacOS.

A second-hand Roland GI-10 would allow you to connect your 13-pin to the Mac via USB. They are a bit old now, but might be a cheap option.