Author Topic: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife  (Read 3934 times)

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Online Rhcole

RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« on: November 12, 2009, 01:28:53 PM »
The RMC Fanout Box is ideal for lots of creative signal routings with all 13 pin gear (See RMC Fanout Box Manual PDF attached for download below)

http://www.rmcpickup.com/fanoutbox.html


Poly Out = GK 13 pin OUT
Poly In = GK 13 pin IN



Plug your 13 pin guitar cable straight into the Fan Out Box's "Poly In" 13 pin jack. Connect six 1/4" TRS Insert cables to your DAW's multichannel Interface I/O, record six separate "dry" hexaphonic guitar tracks (from GK-3) into your DAW (play Chord stabs or lead runs, of whatever you like)  , then put the guitar down, and in your DAW hit rewind and then hit "play" and RMC Fanout box's six separate 1/4" TRS phone jack Outputs will drive your VG-99/GR-55  via the 13 pin GK Input. This allows you to focus on every inter relationship of each FX parameter setting, and really polish and build your GR-55 / VG-99 patches. This same strategy also  works great for tweaking each patch's  volume for "path to patch" volume uniformity  - before the gig.

Allows you to really understand what each GR-55/ VG-99 effect does -since you are no longer stuck playing guitar, and can focus on patch creation.   


The above RMC Fanout box also lets you run Vocals or Keyboards into your VG-99 / GR-55 / GP-10

--

This probably can't be done. At least, I haven't figured it out. When you plug both a guitar and 13 pin into the VG, it deactivates the regular guitar in. I'd like to be able to take my 13 pin guitar and run it through external processors and then into the VG. Or insert them internally as a loop. I thought of taking the regular guitar out and bringing it back in, but there's no way to do that because the guitar jack is deactivated.

Maybe through USB?
« Last Edit: April 24, 2015, 01:30:27 PM by Elantric »

Online Elantric

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2009, 03:48:01 PM »
Quote
I'd like to be able to take my 13 pin guitar and run it through external processors and then into the VG.

Insert an RMC  Fanout Box between the GK-3A equipped guitar and the VG-99 13pin Input

http://www.rmcpickup.com/fanoutbox.html
« Last Edit: November 12, 2009, 07:31:13 PM by Elantric »

Offline washburn100

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2009, 07:15:26 PM »
If you go into system - GK, you can set the GK Connect to Auto, on, or off. I thought in auto, it disconnects the regular 1/4" when a 13 pin is plugged in, but in on or off, it may leave both or or maybe off??? . Not sure and I can't try it right now. Maybe someone else knows for sure or can try it?

Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2009, 11:19:55 PM »
I have a RMC Fanout box and am able to this.

I use the pin 7 loop out of the RMC  to send my GK instrument mag signal to an A/B box that switches between the GK bass and Non-GK instrument. This way I can either process my GK bass with its GK pickup , with its mag pickup  and process other instruments (a guitar in my case) through the multi FX.

Hope that helps.

Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2009, 01:09:44 PM »
Photos of my Fanout setup;
1st photo ; If I want to add a "tube-a-lizer" to my mag sound , I bring the Fanout with the TD100.
2nd photo ; If I need to plug another Non GK instrument along with the GK ones , I add an A/B box with an XLR cable. (Send return W pin1-2 )
« Last Edit: December 25, 2009, 06:01:12 PM by fokof »

Offline scratch17

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 02:15:57 PM »
Has anyone tried this before?

I call it re-trigger looping. I use the term re-trigger because
you use recorded tracks to trigger the VG device. I call it
looping because you re-trigger the VG device a second time
with a set of VG processed (already triggered) tracks.

I know, that's confusing. Hopefully, the steps below will
help to explain the hows and whys of my idea.

I am currently reconfiguring my project studio, so I can't
try it yet, but I hope to do so by mid March or earlier.

Steps:

1. Use a Fanout box to lay down 6 individual tracks (one per string)
in the DAW. Just record the dry signal from your hex pickup.

2. Send one dry track back out of the DAW to a VG source.
It doesn't matter which VG source: VG-8, VG-88,  or VG-99).
It also doesn't matter what patch you use. You can use the
same patch for all six strings or use different patches for
different strings.

As you trigger the VG source with the string's track, record
the wet (output) track from the VG source as a new track
in your DAW, aligned with the original six dry tracks.

3. Repeat step 2 for all six raw string tracks. You should now
have 12 tracks that are all time-aligned in your DAW.

4. Now take one of the wet tracks and repeat step 2.
Try choosing a different patch on the VG source. You can
also try the same patch.

Repeat for all six strings. You'll have 18 tracks at this point.

5. Optional: repeat the process again, as many times as you
like.

6. Optional: Use the dry tracks to feed Guitar Rig, Amplitube,
or any other simulator you like. Again, keep six individual
tracks for the result. Now, use these processed tracks to
re-trigger the VG source.

7. Optional: Use six (monophonic) audio tracks from a MIDI
synth to trigger the VG source. Also, try various sampled
acoustic instruments. Imagine using a six part
French Horn trigger for a VG source? Or a six part array of 2 flutes
2 oboes and 2  piccolos? Mix and match to add your own special
sauce.

8. Optional: Use your effects pug-ins to alter the triggering source
as well.

Why would you want to do any of this?

The short answer is: to change the shape of the envelope that is
sent to the VG source.

Each time you re-trigger (or loop) through the processing,
the envelope of the triggering signal will change. This will change
the resultant processed sound that the VG source outputs.

Just because Roland expects us to use only the dry output of a hex
pickup to trigger a VG source, doesn't mean we have to be limited
to such a source.

Will the result be worthwhile? I don't know, but I'm going to
try it.

Steven Kastner
« Last Edit: April 24, 2015, 01:25:06 PM by Elantric »
Gibson SG Standard
Hamer Duotone
B Moore i2.13
Taylor 710BCE

VG-99 FC-300
RMC Fanout
RJM Mmind GT10
Kemper PA
Mackie 1640
Line6 L2M
FTP

Mesa Recto Pre 20/20
Marshall DSL401C
Fender Bandmaster 68
Ampeg AX70

UA Apollo 8 Duo, Quad
MOTU Trav x2
Radial JDV X-AMP
Fish Aura
Weehbo Plexface
EHX Epitome

Online Elantric

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2011, 02:38:22 PM »
Substitute the term "re-trigger" with "re-sample" or "re-Amp" and  - yes this does work.

can even "Re-COSM Guitar"  - ie. from a dry 6 channel recording right off the GK-3 output (via Fanout box) you may change your guitar to a Les Paul or a Strat  - all in post production using a VG-xx or a GR-55.

Many RMC Fanout Box users have been doing this since 1997  - using a VG-8 and a multichannel audio interface and a DAW.

I first ran into this when helping Aure (original VG-8.com owner) debug ground loops in his studio - it was a battle.

And remains a battle, since the RMC fanout box is unbalanced analog audio - i ended up floating the shields on several connections he had to his Echo Layla 8 interface.


« Last Edit: February 04, 2011, 02:46:56 PM by Elantric »

Offline Brent Flash

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2011, 03:04:16 PM »
Has anyone tried this before?
Some members are re-amping, which is recording the six string output of the GK to individual tracks and then can run that back through the VG for getting new layers of the VG's stereo output. I have not heard much about how useful this is. It would seem that it gives them a lot flexibility in the final recording mix.
I call it re-trigger looping. I use the term re-trigger because you use recorded tracks to trigger the VG device. I call it looping because you re-trigger the VG device a second time with a set of VG processed (already triggered) tracks.
Your use of the term triggering makes me think that you are thinking of the VG-99 as a sound module that is capable of making sound with MIDI input, is that the case?
I know, that's confusing. Hopefully, the steps below will help to explain the hows and whys of my idea.
Don't get me wrong asking these questions, I love experimenting, I am just trying to understand what you are trying to do.
Steps:
1. Use a Fanout box to lay down 6 individual tracks (one per string) in the DAW. Just record the dry signal from your hex pickup.

2. Send one dry track back out of the DAW to a VG source. It doesn't matter which VG source: VG-8, VG-88,  or VG-99). It also doesn't matter what patch you use. You can use the same patch for all six strings or use different patches for different strings.
When you say send the one track back to a VG source, what input are you going to use for this? Also the track for the one string may contain one note of a cord or if you are playing a solo that string may not have any audio to run back through, what is the advantage of sending one track? OK, I think I see that you are saying to do this for all the tracks, so each time you run it back through the VG you will get a stereo output of the VG.
As you trigger the VG source with the string's track, record the wet (output) track from the VG source as a new track in your DAW, aligned with the original six dry tracks.

3. Repeat step 2 for all six raw string tracks. You should now have 12 tracks that are all time-aligned in your DAW.
If you record the 6 stings and the VG output on the first run and then re-amp the 6 individual strings you would have 6+2, original pass +2+2+2+2+2+2, the six re-amp tracks=20 tracks, right?
4. Now take one of the wet tracks and repeat step 2. Try choosing a different patch on the VG source. You can also try the same patch.
Here is where I start to lose you again. The processed track would go back into the VG-99 using what input, the guitar input?
Repeat for all six strings. You'll have 18 tracks at this point.
My count is different but that does not matter, I think I am getting your point.
5. Optional: repeat the process again, as many times as you like.

6. Optional: Use the dry tracks to feed Guitar Rig, Amplitube, or any other simulator you like. Again, keep six individual tracks for the result. Now, use these processed tracks to re-trigger the VG source.

7. Optional: Use six (monophonic) audio tracks from a MIDI synth to trigger the VG source. Also, try various sampled acoustic instruments. Imagine using a six part French Horn trigger for a VG source? Or a six part array of 2 flutes 2 oboes and 2  piccolos? Mix and match to add your own special sauce.

8. Optional: Use your effects pug-ins to alter the triggering source as well.

Why would you want to do any of this?

The short answer is: to change the shape of the envelope that is sent to the VG source.

Each time you re-trigger (or loop) through the processing, the envelope of the triggering signal will change. This will change
the resultant processed sound that the VG source outputs.

Just because Roland expects us to use only the dry output of a hex pickup to trigger a VG source, doesn't mean we have to be limited
to such a source.

Will the result be worthwhile? I don't know, but I'm going to try it.
Steven Kastner
When you do this would you post a recording of what it sounds like? I don't think anyone here has done re-amping quite like this so I would be interested in hearing what you get after you do this.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2011, 03:11:52 PM by Elantric »

Offline vanceg

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2011, 04:08:18 PM »
Yes. Absolutely.

This is commonly called "reamping" ...but this is misleading:  Re-Amping is the term for recording a dry guitar signal and running it though guitar amps again.   I call this activity "Hexaphonic Reamping though the VG-99".

One of the big tricks to this is ensuring that the playback levels from your DAW are at the right level for your VG-99.  Before you re-record through the VG-99, do a quick check to see if the levels that are coming out of your DAW are not too hot for the VG-99. If they are, reduce the level at the DAW and/or reduce the GK sensitivity settings on the VG-99.

When the VG-99 was announced I was ELATED to see that it contained a USB output. I thought SURELY that we would be able to record each of the 6 strings of the guitar directly out to our DAW through the USB port, then play back from our DAW through the VG-99 again.  I thought SURELY they would have built "reamping" directly into the VG-99. Alas, this was not the case and the USB is only stereo in and out.  A  huge disappointment for me.  This is, to me, an OBVIOUS candidate for a feature in whatever the next generation VG-flagship product.

But, for now, we use standard fan out boxes for this.







Offline scratch17

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2011, 06:17:43 PM »
Hi Elantric.

I own an RMC Fanout box. I've done hexaphonic re-amping
for a while. Specifically I use the dry hex pickup's six
mono outputs to Guitar Rig inside my DAW. I've also routed the
signal back through the Fanout Box to my VG-8, and also through a
Radial re-amp box to my real guitar amps.

I do think you may be missing my point. Again, I agree that
what I am postulating is complex.

In a nutshell, I am postulating the following:

The 6 tracks of processed sound, modified by a pass through
a VG source device when sent out of the DAW through the Fanout
Box and into a VG source device will result in a fundamentally
different sound than that of the hex pickup's initial output.

For that matter, any other sound, regardless of the source
(acoustic instrument, sampled instrument, or synthesizer)
used to trigger a VG source will produce a different
sonic result from the VG device. The degree to which this
difference is noticeable should be most directly due to
differences in the ADSR between the other source and a guitar
with a hex pickup.

Now to Brent's questions.

"Your use of the term triggering makes me think that you are
thinking of the VG-99 as a sound module that is capable of
making sound with MIDI input, is that the case? "

No, Brent. This has nothing to do with MIDI. Perhaps the choice of the
word triggering is unfortunate. Perhaps I should have simply said
hexaphonic audio source.

"When you say send the one track back to a VG source, what input
are you going to use for this?"

The RMC Fanout Box is bi-directional. It has a GK input that routes to
six 1/4" TS outputs (for feeding a DAW, for example), and another set
of jacks to send the audio from the DAW back to a GK device.

So, initially, you set 6 mono audio tracks to record ready on your DAW,
and route the outputs from the Fanout box into your A/D audio interface and
start recording. You end up with 6 tracks of mono audio, one per string.

The next step depends somewhat on available hardware, and ultimately
what your choice is for patches on a per string basis.

For simplicity's sake, let's say you want the same patch on all six channels.

Route one of the audio tracks back out through the D/A interface,
back into the Fanout and connect it's GK output to your VG-8 or VG-88.
If you have a VG-99, you can route two tracks at a time, because it has
two independent COSM engines.

You also have to route the left (mono) output on the VG-8 or VG-88,
or both outputs from the VG-99 back into the audio interface and into
your DAW. These outputs will carry the processed VG sound for one or
two strings, which will then be recorded on separate mono tracks. There
may be a slight delay, due to latency so you may have to realign the
tracks in your DAW.

Note that you cannot do more than one or two tracks at a time, unless
you have multiple VG devices. Also, Brent, note that if you are using a
VG-8 or a VG-88, you must record only one processed track at a time.
Do this six times and you end up with six new tracks.

But wait, there's more! You aren't done yet.

You repeat this process again,using the wet tracks you
just finished recording (as a replacement for the hex pickup).
The VG device uses these tracks as its sound source, instead
of the hex pickup.

Steven
Gibson SG Standard
Hamer Duotone
B Moore i2.13
Taylor 710BCE

VG-99 FC-300
RMC Fanout
RJM Mmind GT10
Kemper PA
Mackie 1640
Line6 L2M
FTP

Mesa Recto Pre 20/20
Marshall DSL401C
Fender Bandmaster 68
Ampeg AX70

UA Apollo 8 Duo, Quad
MOTU Trav x2
Radial JDV X-AMP
Fish Aura
Weehbo Plexface
EHX Epitome

Online Elantric

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2011, 06:47:17 PM »
yep - all you postulate is possible.

Offline Brent Flash

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2011, 07:25:53 PM »
Now to Brent's questions.

"Your use of the term triggering makes me think that you are
thinking of the VG-99 as a sound module that is capable of
making sound with MIDI input, is that the case? "

No, Brent. This has nothing to do with MIDI. Perhaps the choice of the
word triggering is unfortunate. Perhaps I should have simply said
hexaphonic audio source.
Yes, you are correct it has nothing to do with MIDI, so I guess triggering was a bad choice of words but I get what you were trying to say now. Just making sure because we have been correcting the misconception that the so called MIDI pickup is sending out MIDI for a few years now and every now and then we get someone new that has not got the word yet.
"When you say send the one track back to a VG source, what input
are you going to use for this?"

The RMC Fanout Box is bi-directional. It has a GK input that routes to
six 1/4" TS outputs (for feeding a DAW, for example), and another set
of jacks to send the audio from the DAW back to a GK device.
So you would have seven audio channels going back into the VG-99, correct. Let us say for our example we are using the VG-99. The 13 pin cable carries 7 audio signals. You do your recording then play back the recordings to re-amp why only one track when you can do all six, is what I was asking?
So, initially, you set 6 mono audio tracks to record ready on your DAW,
and route the outputs from the Fanout box into your A/D audio interface and
start recording. You end up with 6 tracks of mono audio, one per string.

The next step depends somewhat on available hardware, and ultimately
what your choice is for patches on a per string basis.

For simplicity's sake, let's say you want the same patch on all six channels.

Route one of the audio tracks back out through the D/A interface,
back into the Fanout and connect it's GK output to your VG-8 or VG-88.
If you have a VG-99, you can route two tracks at a time, because it has
two independent COSM engines.
This is where I really get confused about what you are tying to do. Let us use a VG-99 as an example. Why can't we route all six recorded tracks back at one time, (into the hex input of the VG-99) why do we need to do one at a time or you say two at a time with the VG-99?
You also have to route the left (mono) output on the VG-8 or VG-88,
or both outputs from the VG-99 back into the audio interface and into
your DAW. These outputs will carry the processed VG sound for one or
two strings, which will then be recorded on separate mono tracks. There
may be a slight delay, due to latency so you may have to realign the
tracks in your DAW.

Note that you cannot do more than one or two tracks at a time, unless
you have multiple VG devices.
This is where I lose you, the VG-99 has 7 audio inputs using the hex in.
Also, Brent, note that if you are using a
VG-8 or a VG-88, you must record only one processed track at a time.
Do this six times and you end up with six new tracks.

But wait, there's more! You aren't done yet.

You repeat this process again,using the wet tracks you
just finished recording (as a replacement for the hex pickup).
The VG device uses these tracks as its sound source, instead
of the hex pickup.

Steven
I think we are just having a communication problem, but no problem, let us hear what you come up with when you get it going. I think you are just describing re-amping in a different way, but that is OK. We love to experiment here and welcome to the group.  :)

Offline scratch17

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2011, 09:45:51 PM »
Brent, your guitar has six strings. Each string can be viewed as a separate
instrument. Think of the strings as six monophonic keyboards laid on a table
side by side. Each keyboard has one output. With a hex pickup, each string
has an output.

The hexaphonic pickup is really six monophonic pickups side by side
with one output per string. Forget about the regular magnetic or piezo
pickup sounds of your guitar. For this application, you only care about
routing the individual audio produced by each string, and you
need to keep those six tracks separate and synchronized in your DAW.

The GK cable carries the six separate audio streams to the input of a GK
equipped device. When you connect it to a VG-99 for example, these six
audio streams are used to determine pitch, envelope and dynamics that
are applied to the COSM models in one or both of the two engines in a 99.

But the VG-99 has only two main outputs, so after processing, the six
audio streams are mixed internally to stereo. That is not what we want for this application.

Yes, with the VG-99 there are sub out, digital out and headphone out jacks,
but routing separate audio streams of each string after processing to different
outputs seams difficult (if not impossible) from what I remember reading in the manual.

The point is, you get a non-processed set of six audio tracks into your DAW.

If you are going to use a single patch for all strings, you can send the audio
from all of the strings back out of the DAW, into the Fanout box, and then
connect the GK output from it to your VG device for initial processing.

If you want different patches on different strings, and you have a VG-8 or VG-88
you must do one string's audio at a time, because there is only one COSM engine
available at a time in those devices. If you have a VG-99, you could do processing
on two tracks at a time, as there are two COSM engines available.

However, getting this far you are actually only at the beginning of the application
I was proposing.

Now that you have a group of six synchronized processed tracks, you can send them back
through a VG-8, VG-88 or VG-99. The resulting sound will be very different from
what you would get directly from a hex pickup.

Steven




Gibson SG Standard
Hamer Duotone
B Moore i2.13
Taylor 710BCE

VG-99 FC-300
RMC Fanout
RJM Mmind GT10
Kemper PA
Mackie 1640
Line6 L2M
FTP

Mesa Recto Pre 20/20
Marshall DSL401C
Fender Bandmaster 68
Ampeg AX70

UA Apollo 8 Duo, Quad
MOTU Trav x2
Radial JDV X-AMP
Fish Aura
Weehbo Plexface
EHX Epitome

Offline Brent Flash

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2011, 09:57:24 PM »
I am starting to be sorry I started this. I know how the VG-99 works I was just wondering why you were not going to send the hex feed you recorded back as a set of hex into the VG-99 instead of one string at a time? But it really does not matter, like I said. I would love to hear what you can do with it so let's hear it.  ;)

Offline Macciza

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2011, 07:17:37 AM »
Now that you have a group of six synchronized processed tracks, you can send them back
through a VG-8, VG-88 or VG-99. The resulting sound will be very different from
what you would get directly from a hex pickup.

Steven
Hi
iMHO This is a bit silly. The VG is expecting a particular signal which it tailors itself to via the stringlength and pickup distance values you put in the setup menu. It also has a number of different settings for different piezo settings as well.

This is done so it has an idea of what to expect. Your processed sound that you intend to play back through it is quite different. What stringlength or pickup distance is it? It has lost it . . . "Any other sound' does not even have these concepts.

Re: the rest of the stuff just re-'modding' the pure hex pickup sound. Yes you could do all the single string stuff with seperate patch on each string if you have a lot of time otherwise software plugins are probably better suited.

But for what you are proposing I don't think it will sound 'nice' . . . .

And remember Brent has a pretty bloody good idea about the capabilities of this unit  . . .
'70s Strat, Brian Moore iM, VG-8, VG-99, FC-300, VL-70m, StringPort, SoftStep, Sentient6, iMac QC i7 27".

Online Elantric

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2011, 08:32:26 AM »
Hey IMHO if it sounds good it is good. Remember they all laughed at Joe Meek because his creative unorthodox use of  mic placement and compression.

Re-reading all the above, seems the underlying goal is to have a unique sound per guitar string.

Reminds me of Gibson CEO Henry J's goal to have a separate Guitar amp for each string , set the amps  in a 6 pointed star arrangement pointing to the center , where you stand with your hexaphonic guitar and experience sonic nirvana ( so he claims)

Totally reminds me of something I saw in the box Video set "The Beatles Anthology" where they paid large sums of money to  "Magic Alex" to wire/ install a multi-track studio for Apple  Records in 1968 that had a circle of speakers - one per track. 



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_Alex

(which I understand George Martin and Geoff Emeric and a young Alan Parsons convinced them to yank out and rebuild a proper 2 channel studio.


And here we are 40 years later and have 5.1 or 7.1 surround sound in our living rooms

The company I work for is designing a 22.1 surround sound system for Cinema with upper and lower screen channels and Voice of god channel above your head on the ceiling. All planned for a future Spielberg blockbuster.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2015, 01:40:32 PM by Elantric »

Offline scratch17

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2011, 04:25:08 PM »
I have no idea if this will produce good results or not. However, I plan
to try it out, and post some results if they turn out well.

Steven
Gibson SG Standard
Hamer Duotone
B Moore i2.13
Taylor 710BCE

VG-99 FC-300
RMC Fanout
RJM Mmind GT10
Kemper PA
Mackie 1640
Line6 L2M
FTP

Mesa Recto Pre 20/20
Marshall DSL401C
Fender Bandmaster 68
Ampeg AX70

UA Apollo 8 Duo, Quad
MOTU Trav x2
Radial JDV X-AMP
Fish Aura
Weehbo Plexface
EHX Epitome

Offline vanceg

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2011, 06:28:12 PM »
I see what you are saying now.  You are doing standard "reamping" but instead of sending all 6 strings back through the VG-99 at the same time, you are sending just one string at a time so that you can have different patches for each string.

Go man go.  Let us know how the process is. Seems quite labor intensive to me, but if you come up with sounds you like a lot, then that's great!

I sometimes work with one sound on three strings and another sound on another three strings by turning off strings 1,3,5 on the A modeling chain and 2,4,6 on the B modeling chain.  This only provides two sounds split up by string, but it's a useful effect.

SOMEday hopefully we'll have a VG-99 that has 6 separate outputs and you can reamp all six strings at the same time, record each processed string individually to your DAW and do that over and over again. Then mix and match all the individual strings you want from each pass... it's the same concept you are advancing here, but 6 strings at a time. No possible with the current hardware, but maybe someday.  Possible with StringPort...but that's a different tool entirely.

This statement gives me a little pause:
"The GK cable carries the six separate audio streams to the input of a GK
equipped device. When you connect it to a VG-99 for example, these six
audio streams are used to determine pitch, envelope and dynamics that
are applied to the COSM models in one or both of the two engines in a 99."

Yes...that's true..in some sense. Though using the phrase "....Used to determine pitch, envelope and dynamics that are applied to the COSM models..."  is implying that the COSM models are something close to or akin to a synth, and they really are not.  For example, that signal that comes down the 13 pin cable....it's not really used to DETERMINE the pitch of the COSM model.  The COSM model simply effects the signal that is coming in. That incoming signal does not in any way change the pitch setting of some magical guitar modeling that is going on inside the VG-99. The signal is simply filtered and altered by the COSM model. The only way in which pitch is detected and used inside the VG-99 is that the pitch of the incoming signal is calculated for any of the Harmonization algorithms, and to set the pitch of oscillators in just a couple of the Synth modules which do utilize some form of synchronized oscillators (much like an OLD school Roland synth such as the 700).   The same is true with amplitude: There is nothing in the VG-99 that is tracking the amplitude of the signal and applying that to a COSM model. Yes, yes of course there is an amplitude tracker which can be mapped to control any number of parameters in the VG-99, but that is fundamentally different than the amplitude being used to control the dynamics of a model.

It's a somewhat subtle difference that I'm trying to illuminate, and I surely don't mean to be argumentative over it. It's just a pet concern of mine that folks understand how the VG-99 works.  And we may just have a tiny bit of a web-based communication difficulty here...that may be all there is to it.... look how many posts it took for me to figure out that you were talking about just "reamping one string at a time so that we can have different VG-99 sounds on each string".

Vance



Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2011, 12:52:21 PM »
I had this box for a long time but never used it.
Long story short: Bought a piezo upright pickup/bridge from a guy but I had to get the whole kit , I had to get the Polydrive with  the fanout. This was about 10 years ago , so I had this fanout and didn't even knew what it was for !

I now found good uses for it.
I know people use this since a long time , but I wanted to share my use of it.

First and foremost , I use the six strings insert to record each string to be able to re-process later.
That is such a usefull feature in the case where you are not totaly sure of wich tone to use.
When mixing , you wish you had use another tone ? No problem , use the GK output on the back of the unit to your VB/VG99 then back in the CPU.
(The GK output in front is direct from the input , the GK output in the back pass through the inserts )
I can imagine the truck load of possibilities to process each strings in a laptop before going to the VB/VG99 in a Live situation :o

I also use it live to pass through analog devices. ( GR-55 anyone? )
In my case a TD100 tube DI/pre.
Two of my GK bass doesn't have 1/4 output , so the Mag signal passes through the GK cable as usual but I also have non-GK basses wich need to pass through the TD100 , so here comes the Fanout swiss tool !

(Download the RMC Fanout Box owner's manual below)
« Last Edit: March 23, 2015, 11:29:05 AM by admsustainiac »

Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2011, 12:54:38 PM »
I use the mono insert (pin 7 insert)
to pass through my TD100 tube pre/DI and back to the VB99.
 
You can use it this way for any pedals , analog processor , non-GK guitar , or if you have a GR55 use it as an 1/4 input to process a mag signal , etc.....
« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 02:14:05 PM by fokof »

Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2011, 01:00:18 PM »
When I need to use another non-GK bass , I use an XLR with 1/4" inserts.
Using an XLR makes it practicle to use the right lenght depending on the gig.
ON the Radial split box , the 1/4 from the fan out is my mag from my GK bass , I plug the other non-GK in the #2 and switch accordingly.
So the non-GK also pass through the TD100 ( that is the main point)

With an On+On split box , you could have a GK bass + another person playing a Mag in the same processor , even a GR55 (if that need arise or for some crazy ideas)
« Last Edit: March 14, 2011, 04:54:57 PM by fokof »

Offline Frank

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2012, 06:36:33 AM »
Hi, Does anyone have a Fanout Box manual that they'd care to upload or a link to one.

Thanks.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2015, 01:24:03 PM by Elantric »

Offline fokof

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2012, 12:09:34 PM »
I have a Fanout and never found and other info than this:
(wich you probably already have seen)

http://www.rmcpickup.com/fanoutbox.html

All the info is there.

Offline Frank

Re: RMC Fanout = GK swiss knife
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2012, 02:20:53 PM »
Thanks, although Richard McClish has just emailed me a copy.