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Author Topic: New ATG Guitar Build  (Read 299 times)

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GuitarBuilder

New ATG Guitar Build
« on: March 28, 2017, 07:05:12 PM »

I used a Warmoth roasted Swamp Ash body with Maple neck. The installation was tricky - don't attempt this unless you have some luthier and woodworking skills!
I still have to work out the power source; my original plan to use the Fishman Fluence battery failed, so I need to add a battery box instead. Otherwise, it works fine; it's nice to have the two encoders on the guitar so I don't have to mess with fret control!





A Warmoth Roasted Swamp Ash body. Tape marks for pick guard edge


Cavity routed for ATG DSP board


It fits!


Application of conductive paint to all cavities


Ready for electronics


Marking and installing hex pickup


Test fitting finished pick guard, Wilkinson tremolo, and output jack


Hole for 8-pin MIDI jack


Test fitting MIDI jack


Test fitting Fishman Fluence battery pack (this is before I concluded that it could not supply enough current for the ATG)


After True-Oil finish. MIDI wiring and battery cable are installed


Output and 8-pin MIDI jacks installed


Pick guard and DSP board wired up and ready! Note the single wire connectors


The big moment - will it all fit right?


It was tight, but everything fit


Battery connection and ground in the tremolo cavity


Warmoth Birdseye Maple neck attached. All hardware is black!


Tuner double pin holes drilled using StewMac template tool


Schaller M6 locking tuners installed


Love these tuners!


Top of the neck showing Birdseye Maple fingerboard


Close-up of controls. Note the two encoders between volume (top) and tone (bottom). I designed custom dials for each encoder


Sounds great!  The two encoders greatly improve on the AT-200.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 04:49:46 PM by GuitarBuilder »
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cags12

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2017, 09:03:32 AM »


I still have to work out the power source; my original plan to use the Fishman Fluence battery failed, so I need to add a battery box instead. Otherwise, it works fine; it's nice to have the two encoders on the guitar so I don't have to mess with fret control!

Test fitting Fishman Fluence battery pack (this is before I concluded that it could not supply enough current for the ATG)


Very nice build! I am still working on my own one.

I was myself thinking on using Fishman's battery pack. Did you determine how many mA the DSP4 needs? Also how much does the Fishman provide?
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whippinpost91850

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2017, 11:23:59 AM »

Looks great!  I gotta figure out the time to build mine.   Gotta mount the single coil in the center of my SG synth guitar first though
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GuitarBuilder

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2017, 11:35:06 AM »

Very nice build! I am still working on my own one.

I was myself thinking on using Fishman's battery pack. Did you determine how many mA the DSP4 needs? Also how much does the Fishman provide?

I measured the current draw for the ATG fully wired pickguard to be about 250mA (using the standard AA battery pack).  According to Fishman Tech Support, the Fluence battery pack is limited to 10mA for short circuit protection.  It's too bad, because the 3.7V LiPo battery inside is rated at 1500mAh.  I don't have the energy or desire to hack their charge/protection circuitry, so I will either route the body for the Antares battery or develop my own LiPo solution on the tremolo cavity.
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GuitarBuilder

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 11:36:01 AM »

Looks great!  I gotta figure out the time to build mine.   Gotta mount the single coil in the center of my SG synth guitar first though

Be prepared for some serious woodworking and wiring!
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whippinpost91850

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2017, 11:41:30 AM »

No problem. I'll probably hook up my overarm router, before I start that project.  ;D
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GuitarBuilder

Fishman Fluence Battery Hack
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2017, 03:29:48 PM »

As I noted earlier in this thread, my original plan to use a Fishman Fluence battery pack to power the Antares ATG luthier kit failed miserably due to the unpublished 10mA cutoff designed into the Fluence for short protection.  The ATG needs at least 25x that current!

I considered many options, including an easy one: get an external battery and glue/velcro to the Strat tremolo back plate - done!  I did so with this battery:


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01EKXR67M/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I fabricated a USB power adapter; charging the pack is simple via a mini-USB on the side.  It works very well and lasts a very long time (5000 mAh), but is uncomfortable because it sticks out quite a bit from the back of the guitar.  However, this may not deter some and it's therefore a low-effort option.

I still liked the Fishman Fluence form factor, so I decided to hack it.  Inside is a 3.7V 1500 mAh LiPo battery and a small circuit board for charging, boosting the voltage to 9V, and overcurrent protection.  The board would not be easy to modify so a replacement was found at Adafruit:


https://www.adafruit.com/product/2465

This board boosts the voltage to 5V and is capable of delivering a massive 1000mA.  It also has all connections conveniently broken out on the side of the board.  I needed a micro-USB connector at 90 degrees to the board, which was accomplished using this breakout board and a 90 degree header:


https://www.adafruit.com/product/1833  (the header shown is the one that comes in the kit; replace it with a 90 degree version)

Lastly, I added a small switch to be able to turn off the booster in order to conserve power; while it draws a minimal amount of current when idle, this will ensure zero draw when storing the guitar:


https://www.adafruit.com/product/805

I replaced the Fishman battery with a larger capacity, 2500 mAh LiPo:


https://www.adafruit.com/product/328

Any larger than this would be too thick and defeat the whole purpose of using the Fishman battery case.  The assembly before fitting into the case looks like this:




The battery was attached to the case using Goop (which makes it removable); the circuit board was mounted using 4 screws and stand-offs:



The most difficult part was cutting the case for access to the micro-USB and switch.  I applied insulation to the back of the board and battery and mounted it to the tremolo cavity.  Overall, it is about half as thick as the first solution and looks a lot cleaner.

If I had to make more of these, I'd like to explore 3D printing the case for a more professional look.  If any members would like to assist with that, I would be very grateful.

whippinpost91850

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2017, 04:03:11 PM »

This is very cool... I'm getting ready to do a luthier kit install in my custom synth guitar. This will a nice option for power
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cags12

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2017, 07:45:48 AM »

This is great, I am considering doing the same but with the Universal battery pack form factor or style directly on the electronics back plate of a PRS guitar.

I wonder if instead of taking the input power from the mini USB connector it can somehow be taken from the MIDI connector and use the AT200B as the power source. I know it is 9v but perhaps something can be workout.

Have you study that possibility.
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GuitarBuilder

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2017, 03:46:44 PM »

This is great, I am considering doing the same but with the Universal battery pack form factor or style directly on the electronics back plate of a PRS guitar.

I wonder if instead of taking the input power from the mini USB connector it can somehow be taken from the MIDI connector and use the AT200B as the power source. I know it is 9v but perhaps something can be workout.

Have you study that possibility.

Yes, when you plug in the 8-pin MIDI connector and connect to the AT-200B it will turn off the battery and power the electronics directly.  One thing to keep in mind is that the ATG Luthier Kit does not connect the guitar output to the AT-200B like the Peavey AT-200 does.  Antares quotes the reason to be excessive noise on the audio line caused by MIDI signals.  So now you need to run two cables from the guitar!  I decided it made more sense to use the battery and reserve the MIDI connection for programming only (I got the 2 encoder version just so I could control the guitar without an iPad).
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Elantric

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2017, 03:49:49 PM »

Use a custom cable avoids the noise


I use Mogami 4channel snake cable

Quote
Yes, when you plug in the 8-pin MIDI connector and connect to the AT-200B it will turn off the battery and power the electronics directly.  One thing to keep in mind is that the ATG Luthier Kit does not connect the guitar output to the AT-200B like the Peavey AT-200 does.  Antares quotes the reason to be excessive noise on the audio line caused by MIDI signals.  So now you need to run two cables from the guitar!  I decided it made more sense to use the battery and reserve the MIDI connection for programming only (I got the 2 encoder version just so I could control the guitar without an iPad).
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 03:52:10 PM by Elantric »
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cags12

Re: New ATG Guitar Build
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2017, 05:01:25 AM »

Yes, when you plug in the 8-pin MIDI connector and connect to the AT-200B it will turn off the battery and power the electronics directly.  One thing to keep in mind is that the ATG Luthier Kit does not connect the guitar output to the AT-200B like the Peavey AT-200 does.  Antares quotes the reason to be excessive noise on the audio line caused by MIDI signals.  So now you need to run two cables from the guitar!  I decided it made more sense to use the battery and reserve the MIDI connection for programming only (I got the 2 encoder version just so I could control the guitar without an iPad).

Hi, I am aware of all of this. I actually meant if something can be worked out so the input of the Charger/Booster instead of coming from an external 5v USB cable, would come from the 9v input from the midi cable so the battery can get charged when using the AT200B. I know something would be needed to step down the voltage.

It would be great if the DSP board could charge batteries directly but I guess it is hardware impossible with what is on it right now.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 05:16:16 AM by cags12 »
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