Author Topic: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?  (Read 293 times)

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Offline Rhcole

This is a general guitar topic, but I thought I would compare what our technically-astute members who enjoy advanced guitar technologies think compared to guitar players from the Telecaster site.

I posted recently about wanting to preserve the finish on nickel pickups and even Bigsbys. I'm going to experiment with coating them to prevent damage and oxidation.

It occurred to me that there is a big gap between a "used" guitar and a guitar that is so beat-up it is now MORE beautiful. Thus, relicing where you pay experts to beat your guitars up for you. My guitars never arrive there because I handle them really carefully, so any damage to them sticks out as being "wrong".

In other words, EVERYBODY AGREES that if you have a beautiful brand-new Tele and you chip the headstock or ding the body, you swear and the guitar just dropped in value. It is now a "used" guitar. Nobody will pay you as much for the guitar, even if you list it as "Expertly Dinged by Our Skilled Craftsmen".

So, I wonder, what bridges the gap? When does a used beat-up guitar become something new again and thus more valuable?

Your thoughts/Pics?

Online chrish

I would suspect that it depends on who owned the  guitar.



 I imagine Willie Nelson's acoustic guitar would fetch top dollar as a collector's item, and we all know what that looks like.

« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 01:49:06 PM by admsustainiac »

Offline HecticArt

I've never been a fan of relicing. It seems very insincere to me. If the wear is from years of being played like Willie's, that's one thing, but to pretend it's gotten in that state because you've put that many hours in on it doesn't seem right.

I used to build furniture, so I got in the habit of putting lots of time into making finishes as flawless as possible. I appreciate the work that goes into making a guitar, and I try to keep mine looking as new as I can. I'm sure I probably baby them much more than is really necessary, but when I bought my first couple, I literally had to save my pennies to buy them. I guess the habit stuck.

Nicks and scuffs happen - it can't be avoided. The first one sucks like getting the first nick in a new car, but you don't trade it in for a new car, you keep on driving.

My sweat is hard on metal finishes, so I'm curious about what you find works to protect them.

As far as value of damaged guitars, Willie's worn acoustic, Jimi's torched Strat, Townshend's first smash, and a handful of others, I see adding value for the historic significance. Like cherish said, it's about whose it was.

Online chrish

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 12:09:54 PM »
The folks at Ibanez must have read your thread. I don't think it's a great marketing strategy however.

http://www.ibanez.com/products/u_hb_detail17.php?year=2017&cat_id=7&series_id=119&data_id=44&color=CL01

"ARTSTAR Vintage
There's something irresistible about a vintage guitar - well worn with battle scars, earned throughout years of hard use. Like a favorite old leather jacket, it immediately feels familiar. Now, Ibanez proudly offers Artstar Vintage - the alternative to pricey vintage instruments. The Artstar Vintage "aging" process applies to hardware and other appointments, as well as the body, giving each guitar a convincingly real, worn appearance."
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 12:15:44 PM by admsustainiac »

Offline Elantric

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 12:17:59 PM »
I Played these "new" Ibanez guitars at 2017 Winter NAMM

surprisingly nice guitars IMHO
Quote
I posted recently about wanting to preserve the finish on nickel pickups and even Bigsbys. I'm going to experiment with coating them to prevent damage and oxidation.

It occurred to me that there is a big gap between a "used" guitar and a guitar that is so beat-up it is now MORE beautiful. Thus, relicing where you pay experts to beat your guitars up for you. My guitars never arrive there because I handle them really carefully, so any damage to them sticks out as being "wrong".

In other words, EVERYBODY AGREES that if you have a beautiful brand-new Tele and you chip the headstock or ding the body, you swear and the guitar just dropped in value. It is now a "used" guitar. Nobody will pay you as much for the guitar, even if you list it as "Expertly Dinged by Our Skilled Craftsmen".


I still have my 2005 Gretsch 6120 lacquer Brian Setzer, but I played several gigs in harsh environments, and the nickel plated hardware has developed significant aging.

i was ready to take the guitar apart and clean  / buff/ polish the nickel hardware (Blitz polish)- but when I show the guitar in its current aged condition to other guitarists, they tell me DO NOT CHANGE A THING!

The aging adds Mojo and raises the $$$ value   
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 12:33:14 PM by Elantric »

Offline Rhcole

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 12:32:15 PM »
Elantric,

The aging may add mojo but I wonder if it adds to the value. I followed a thread on the tele site and most people downgraded the resale value of a  worn guitar with only a few exceptions. The already reliced instruments from Fender etc. likely hold their value even if they are beat up more, but for your average Ibanez, wear just drops the sale price.


Offline Shingles

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 01:10:58 PM »
I actually disagree with the OP.
I don’t find reliced guitars beautiful. I can appreciate real vintage instruments that carry their battle scars with pride, but not if its fake.
I like to buy guitars in pristine condition and if they get dinged or scratched or dulled in my use, then that, to me, makes them more ‘mine’ and I don’t mind it showing.

Nik
--------------------------------
GT-Pro, VG99, Axon AX100, Repeater
Godin, PRS, Crafter and Roland guitars
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Online Brak(E)man

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2017, 01:22:14 PM »
Short answer
Never
swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
- Lydia Lunch

Online CodeSmart

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Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2017, 05:57:27 PM »
When (if ever) you buy a new car, would you want it "pre-smashed"?
When you buy a new (if ever) house would you want it "pre-mouldered"?
When you buy a new drilling tool, do you want it "pre-burnt"
When you buy a new chair for your veranda, do you want it "pre-fat ass destroyed"?
When you buy a new book, do you want pages to be pre-bent with pre-underlining sentences in yellow?
When you buy a new barbecue grill, do you want it"pre-rusty"?
When you buy new strings do you want them "pre-fatted" and "pre-untunable"
When you buy new picks do you want them "pre-unsharped"
When you buy a new WC.... etc...you get the picture, with stains, smell and everything...

Short answer "Never"
Got more gear than I need...and I like it!


Offline reingarnichts

Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2017, 02:23:14 AM »
It really never adds value.
But:
I like my instruments worn in, like a good pair of shoes. I don't want to worry about damaging the finish. I'm always kind of relieved when the first marks on a new instrument begin to show.

Offline Dream_Theory

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Re: From Mint to Trashed... When Does Damage Make a Guitar MORE Valuable?
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 08:51:56 AM »
My theory: nobody wants a car that is 12  years old, but at a certain point jalopies becomes a classic.

Because I got my guitar relatively cheap, I have no anxiety about dings. I drilled holes to add toggles for series/single/parallel. No worries, drill away.

GK wire caused minor abrasion to the finish, so I reversed the direction and installed it the other way so my hand does not rub it against the fiish.

Ibanez comes out with eye popping finishes every year.  Nothing wrong with eye candy. I got a used base model and put in Gison pickups.

electric: Ibanez SA 73 semihollow body with Gibson Classic '57's, acoustic: mahogany jumbo, recording: Cubase Artist 8.5 or Tascam DP008
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"Every patch has a story to tell."