Author Topic: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation  (Read 192 times)

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Offline Elantric

DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« on: November 14, 2017, 12:28:50 PM »

The famous TENNIS BALL RISER. Does it actually work? Is it the real secret to playing drums in an apartment? This DIY build is a go-to solution for apartment drummers or anyone needing to soundproof their kit. But it seems like nobody’s really telling us how well these things work. We assume that they’re doing some good and that our money and efforts aren’t going to waste… but who really wants to go to the effort to build one of these if we don’t ABSOLUTELY KNOW that it does work? Today we’ll both find that out. I was curious, so I built one. I also tested it from the floor below so that we can all know whether this endeavor is worth the sweat we have to put into it. Because I live in an apartment, I don’t own a truck, and I don’t have access to power tools, this is also the NO-TOOLS version of how to build a tennis ball riser (with the exception of a drill). So sit back, relax, and enjoy this alternate tennis-ball-riser-building-process, and let’s find out whether these things actually do any good.

Offline admsustainiac

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 12:35:51 PM »



Offline Majiken

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Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 07:40:32 AM »
Fun watch, but seeing no provisions for air supply or circulation I'd be concerned about asphyxiation... maybe good for podcasting or doing vids, not really a studio as such- then again, with today's technology you can record just about anywhere.
Take what you need, put back a bit more, leave the place behind you better than it was before :-)

www.majiken.rocks

Offline chrish

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 02:26:18 PM »
Fun watch, but seeing no provisions for air supply or circulation I'd be concerned about asphyxiation... maybe good for podcasting or doing vids, not really a studio as such- then again, with today's technology you can record just about anywhere.
not to mention that it is a good idea to wear a dust mask when cutting polyisocyanurate insulation. It's considered a mechanical irritant.

"Use only with adequate ventilation. Minimize dust generation and accumulation.
Routine housekeeping should be instituted to ensure that dusts do not accumulate on
surfaces. Avoid breathing dusts generated during use of this material. Avoid contact
with skin, eyes or clothing. Wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling and
before eating, drinking, or using tobacco.
Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities
Storage Keep away from heat, sparks, and flame. Keep away from incompatible materials."
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 02:34:34 PM by chrish »

Offline Elantric

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 02:30:04 PM »
not to mention that's a good idea to wear a dust mask when cutting polyisocyanurate.

"Use only with adequate ventilation. Minimize dust generation and accumulation.
Routine housekeeping should be instituted to ensure that dusts do not accumulate on
surfaces. Avoid breathing dusts generated during use of this material. Avoid contact
with skin, eyes or clothing. Wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling and
before eating, drinking, or using tobacco.
Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities
Storage Keep away from heat, sparks, and flame. Keep away from incompatible materials."

Agreed! - Many great folks have been lost because lack of proper dust masks

http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=11656.0

Offline chrish

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 02:45:10 PM »
Agreed! - Many great folks have been lost because lack of proper dust masks

http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=11656.0
yes it's especially important for luthiers. Some of the woods that they use are considered down right toxic.

Personally because of long-term wood  dust exposure I have to wear a respirator rated for volatile organic chemicals when when I have to cut cedar.

Generally I wear dust masks but on a large construction project dust is hard to avoid.

https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/toxic-woods
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 02:47:14 PM by chrish »

Offline lespauled

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2017, 10:49:16 AM »
I watched a video that showed that simple towels make the best sound dampening.   He made wood frames, and covered them with black fabric, and stuffed them with towels.  Very cheap.  Looked and worked great.

Offline szilard

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2017, 12:20:00 PM »
It looks like he over did the acoustic foam. I'll bet the room is really dead - IMO that's not good for playing or recording.

Offline chrish

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2017, 03:17:39 PM »
It looks like he over did the acoustic foam. I'll bet the room is really dead - IMO that's not good for playing or recording.
  I think I read somewhere where the old Studios used to stick Amplified speakers with microphones out in reverberant stairwells and hallways to capture that sound.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 03:19:20 PM by chrish »

Offline admsustainiac

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2017, 03:27:36 PM »
  I think I read somewhere where the old Studios used to stick Amplified speakers with microphones out in reverberant stairwells and hallways to capture that sound.


« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 03:34:59 PM by admsustainiac »

Online mooncaine

Re: DIY - Home Studio Sound Isolation
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2017, 01:46:41 AM »
"Thanks, pal."  :D