Author Topic: Roland GR-D  (Read 400 times)

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Offline jodama

Roland GR-D
« on: March 13, 2017, 07:37:07 AM »
There's no board for the GR-D/GR-S and I got the 'old thread' warning when I went to post at the one place they seem to be discussed on this site, so I'm starting a new one. I wasn't sure what my purpose was for writing this, but it kind of sounds like a review, so I'm putting it here.

At the moment, I'm buying any (sub-$200 or so) 13 pin stuff I come across, and I happened to find a GR-D at a local store a week or two ago. I had a mild interest in the GR-S, so I was kind of disappointed to find its brother, but I went for it anyway. It set me back $80 which might be too much...I don't know.

I've never been a big distortion user and in fact, this is the first dedicated distortion pedal I've ever owned. I have to say though...I like it. The sounds are really synthetic, which is a good thing for me. It sounds like more of a synth-overdrive effect than a distortion pedal, which makes it more useful for my purposes.

All of the sounds it can create are available on the GP-10 for the most part. However, the 2nd distortion sound doubles straight distortion with a wave synth, which you can't strictly do on the GP-10 (to my knowledge). You can have one or the other, but not both at the same time.

At high gain settings it's a bit too loud, but I think that's due to my piezo pickup rather than the pedal itself, since I've seen the GR-D described as 'no noise' distortion.

Anyway, I don't know how much use I'm going to get out of it, and I definitely don't think it is worth $300 or whatever they were charging when it was first released, but it's a fun thing to mess around with. If it weren't for the noise, I might even try to incorporate it into my arsenal somehow.

Does else anyone care about these things at this point or are they too one-dimensional/redundant?

Offline admsustainiac

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2017, 08:07:24 AM »

Offline Brak(E)man

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2017, 08:54:48 AM »
All of the sounds it can create are available on the GP-10 for the most part. However, the 2nd distortion sound doubles straight distortion with a wave synth, which you can't strictly do on the GP-10 (to my knowledge). You can have one or the other, but not both at the same time.

--------

Does else anyone care about these things at this point or are they too one-dimensional/redundant?


You can have straight distortion with the normal PU and a wave synth from the hex on gp10

And I'd love to own both the gr-d , Gr-s and wp-20g
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 09:05:25 AM by Brak(E)man »
swimming with a hole in my body

I play Country music too, I'm just not sure which country it's from...

"The only thing worse than a guitar is a guitarist!"
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Offline admsustainiac

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2017, 09:54:37 AM »
The 2012 era GR-S- / GR-D were overpriced and not a popular seller  - fundamental flaw was lack of a "GK Thru"  - presented a hurdle for existing GK 13 pin users to add these pedal to their rig. And Roland stated that a $300 US-20 GK Selector was the method to add a GR-D to your GR-55 rig ( $300 GR-D + $300 US-20 = $600) 

Also there were few compelling reasons for a non 13 pin guitarist to buy a new GK-3 PU , install it on your guitar just for the GR-D
http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=7250.0

Right before release of the superior $300 GP-10 , both the GR-S, GR-D were blown out for $99 by Roland dealers   -

IMHO a GP-10 remains a better investment 


FWIW - The SpiceTone 6Appeal hex fuzz is a better tool than GR-D IMHO
http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=12104.msg88081#msg88081



« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 10:09:52 AM by admsustainiac »

Offline Peter the GR-eat...

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2017, 04:40:01 PM »
I bought the GR-D and S  some time ago when they were being sold-out cheep.

I like them both! I might even post a review some day. :)

Offline chlorinemist

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2017, 08:16:09 AM »
Spicetone 6Appeal is the way to go. 1000%

It does nearly everything both the GR-D and GR-S do, but fully editable. The GR-S poly slow gear doesn't even have an attack parameter! The 6Appeal, on the other hand, has a poly slow gear/autoswell effect with a full-blown ADSR envelope section, complete with a parameter for switching between logarithmic, exponential and linear response curves, and 18 mod destinations. It is as deep as any synthesizer, and features a 100% analog signal path that is 100% digitally controlled. A real musical instrument, fully equipped for musical use.

Offline Peter the GR-eat...

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2017, 02:41:32 PM »
I don’t have a Spicetone 6Appeal. Would love to but haven't been able to afford it.
Everything i read and heard about it make me impressed . It is on my list for sure!


Actually the the only ADSRish parameter the GR-S has, is attac (color) same as GP-10.
It has the hold function as well. The hold works with a 1/4 jack as well.

Editing is direct an esay with both GR-D and S. At lest when starting in manual mode.
The downside in once you saved a sound i one of the four slots, you can’t get any visual overview of what you saved..

Im not comparing them them with the 6Appeal. It seems to on another lever.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2017, 10:13:24 AM by Peter the GR-eat... »

Offline Rhcole

Re: Roland GR-D
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2017, 11:19:48 AM »
Anybody interested in a GR-S lightly used, PM me.